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Anti-Semitic Chanters Among Anti-Austerity Protesters in Rome

According to The Jewish Telegraphic Agency, police clashed with protesters throughout Rome yesterday. Some of these protesters, says The JTA shouted anti-Semitic, pro-Palestnian slogans outside the synagogue’s doors as they threw vases against the property.

According to The Global Times, protesters at other locations hurled rocks at police officers, several of whom sustained injuries. One officer, says The Times, was said to be in “serious condition” after he was surrounded and beaten by protestors in Turin.

According to Russia Today, protests in Rome became “chaotic” as protestors began throwing “rocks, bottles and firecrackers” at police officers and police responded by unleashing tear gas to break up the crowds. The protests, says Russia Today, left at least seventeen officers injured.

The JTA reports that clashes between police and protests became violent in several parts of the city and that most of the protests involved complaints about Rome’s economic situation.

According to The Global Times, many of the protestors were particularly opposed to the “harsh austerity measures” Rome was set to take, in order to combat “the Eurozone debt crisis.” According to The JTA, The protests reportedly stretched across several cities and involved “tens of thousands of people, many of whom also went on strike.

The protests did not only stretch across cities, but across countries as well. According to The Times Herald-Record, Rome’s protests were a part of a larger protest against austerity measures that extended across the streets of Europe. Indeed, according to The Herald-Record, the protests “stalled several nations” across the continent.

The largest protests, said the Herald-Record were in cities like Madrid, Barcelona, Rome, Milan, Padua and Brescia, but smaller protests were also held in cities in Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands. Strikes, said the Herald-Record also stalled traffic in Portugal.

The JTA reports that the protests were particularly troubling to the synagogue in Rome, because it had been “30 years” since the last demonstration outside the synagogue had taken place. During that demonstration, says the JTA, which was held in 1982, “a Palestinian terror attack” left a child dead and “left scores injured.” The synagogue has been under police protection since that time.

Credit: Jewocity

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